Identifying Central Texas Birds in Your Travisso Backyard

Whether you are an avid birder or an ambitious amateur, Travisso’s landscape overlooking the Texas Hill Country is a bird lover’s haven. From sunrise to sunset Central Texas birds provide a free show of vibrant colors and delightful songs. And their array of unusual habits makes this backyard sport a rewarding experience. Birding is a combination of a bit of luck and having the right feeder to attract them. It’s also a lot of knowing what you are looking at.

Even if you are new to the Lone Star State we’re sure you already know that everything is bigger here. Same goes for the 600 species of birds that make Texas their home. It’s more than in any other state. That’s an impressive number and something to keep in mind when you travel through the state’s large land mass. To identify the birds that frequent your backyard we put together a list of some common species in the area. Remember to equip yourself with a good pair of binoculars. Let’s go!

Black-capped Vireo and the Golden-cheeked Warbler

Whether you are an avid birder or an ambitious amateur, Travisso’s landscape overlooking the Texas Hill Country is a bird lover’s haven. From sunrise to sunset Central Texas birds provide a free show of vibrant colors and delightful songs. And their array of unusual habits makes this backyard sport a rewarding experience. Birding is a combination of a bit of luck and having the right feeder to attract them. It’s also a lot of knowing what you are looking at.

Even if you are new to the Lone Star State we’re sure you already know that everything is bigger here. Same goes for the 600 species of birds that make Texas their home. It’s more than in any other state. That’s an impressive number and something to keep in mind when you travel through the state’s large land mass. To identify the birds that frequent your backyard we put together a list of some common species in the area. Remember to equip yourself with a good pair of binoculars. Let’s go!

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Hummingbirds are tiny, interesting creatures that we love to attract to our yards. They have long beaks, nonstop fluttering wings and unique flight patterns. And they’re frequently seen noshing at backyard nectar feeders and on flowers across Central Texas. As one of the most numerous breeders in Texas, the black-chinned hummingbird is both beautiful and adaptable. When not at your feeder you can find it by listening for its distinctive low-pitched humming wings. It can also be found perched on bare branches at the tops of dead or live trees.

 

Carolina Chickadee

This small, gray, large-headed bird with white cheeks and a plump body is an indication of its frequent habit of visiting backyard bird feeders. They love to snack and can be seen in urban areas and suburban backyards primarily in east and Central Texas. As a year-round Texas resident, the Carolina Chickadee breeds from February to July. And although it closely resembles the black-capped chickadee, it has its own distinct identity and voice. Its unique song is made up of a long four-note whistle unlike those of other chickadees.

Lesser Goldfinch

With its bright yellow belly and black head and wings the male lesser goldfinch is an easy bird to recognize. While the female lesser goldfinch’s appearance is slight different. Females sports an olive back, dull yellow underparts, black wings and two whitish wingbars. Both males and females have long, pointy wings and short, notched tails. Small in size and social by nature, the lesser goldfinch is a flock bird that feeds on seeds and grains in weedy fields and at feeders. They can be commonly seen in suburban areas where their songs can be easily heard. While in a flock its song is characterized by a wheezy and descending call with one to two notes at a time.

Carolina Chickadee

This small, gray, large-headed bird with white cheeks and a plump body is an indication of its frequent habit of visiting backyard bird feeders. They love to snack and can be seen in urban areas and suburban backyards primarily in east and Central Texas. As a year-round Texas resident, the Carolina Chickadee breeds from February to July. And although it closely resembles the black-capped chickadee, it has its own distinct identity and voice. Its unique song is made up of a long four-note whistle unlike those of other chickadees.

Lesser Goldfinch

With its bright yellow belly and black head and wings the male lesser goldfinch is an easy bird to recognize. While the female lesser goldfinch’s appearance is slight different. Females sports an olive back, dull yellow underparts, black wings and two whitish wingbars. Both males and females have long, pointy wings and short, notched tails. Small in size and social by nature, the lesser goldfinch is a flock bird that feeds on seeds and grains in weedy fields and at feeders. They can be commonly seen in suburban areas where their songs can be easily heard. While in a flock its song is characterized by a wheezy and descending call with one to two notes at a time.

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